Slavery Of The Mind

Jack Donovan writes why he is not a white nationalist:

We live in an age where the strongest white men in the world allow themselves to be pushed around by gossipy bloggers, church ladies, sleazy reporters, rent-seeking academic activists, little fat screaming lesbians and weak autistic hipsters.

The best and most successful white men in the world are infected with parasites and if they refuse to stand up and tell these garbage people to fuck off, they deserve to fail. They deserve to be enslaved by their lessers. Their race deserves to perish.

I’m not a White Nationalist because I don’t think people are worth saving just because they’re white.

Okay, you’re white. Great. Most white people suck. What else have you got?

I share a genetic and cultural heritage with white people. Race is more than “skin color.” But all white people are not my people. I don’t particularly care about the fate of any racial group. What happens to “white people” is not my problem or my responsibility. I want to be surrounded with people who share not only my vague common ancestry, but my values and beliefs. Anyone who read Becoming a Barbarian knows I don’t care about “the politics of the Empire.” I want to leave it all behind.

I wanted to springboard off his remarks and say a few things that have been percolating in my head as of late. It can apply to libertarians just as much as white nationalists – and pretty much everybody in-between.

There are two forms of slavery.

The state clearly enforces an indirect form of physical slavery. It enslaves you by taxing your labor, your purchases, your sales, your everyday activities. It uses coercion and aggression to control where you go, where you work, and how you live.

But there is another kind of slavery that is far more dangerous, destructive, and harmful. That is the slavery of the mind.

And the thing about it, is that the state doesn’t have to do anything. Most people willingly enslave their own minds.

How?

They enslave themselves when they surrender to inaction or passivity because they believe nothing they do matters.

They enslave themselves when, rather than taking meaningful action in their life, they are glued to the latest happenings in D.C. as though it were a matter of life and death.

They enslave themselves when they waste countless hours online bitching about things happening thousands of miles away that in reality has zero effect on things they might otherwise do.

They enslave themselves when they are unable to experience happiness and joy because of unhealthy obsessions with existential problems, real or imagined. The state is evil and a criminal entity, but it can’t stop you from enjoying a beautiful summer day or a moment of peaceful serenity on a winter’s night. It can’t prevent you from relishing a good book or having good conversation in social company.

They enslave themselves when they live vicariously through the state and seek legitimacy through it. Rather than create their own communities, celebrate their own holidays, honor their own heroes, erect their own monuments, they fight over control of institutions that have long been coopted.

They enslave themselves when they focus on impersonal problems rather than personal improvement.

The older I get, the more I appreciate the Serenity Prayer:

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; the courage to change the things I can; and the wisdom to know the difference.

Too many people want the courage to change things they cannot and the serenity to accept things they can change as they are.

If there is one thing I would advise to anyone, it’s to let go of things beyond your control. Your caring or not caring about them means nothing. Care about what you can achieve and accomplish. Stop allowing irrelevant external events to dictate your life decisions. Stop asking or waiting for permission from anyone.

Moreover, stop worrying about the fate of people for whom you are not responsible for nor hold authority over. It’s not your fault, and it’s not your problem.

Take responsibility only for that which you have authority. As for the rest, say a prayer and accept it.

As Bob Marley put it, emancipate yourself from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in general political thoughts, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Slavery Of The Mind

  1. Gunner Q says:

    “They enslave themselves when they are unable to experience happiness and joy because of unhealthy obsessions with existential problems, real or imagined. The state is evil and a criminal entity, but it can’t stop you from enjoying a beautiful summer day or a moment of peaceful serenity on a winter’s night. It can’t prevent you from relishing a good book or having good conversation in social company.”

    A critically important point these days. Too many people either get very deep in politics beyond their control or else put blinders on and see no evil. One must thread that needle for good mental health even in better times.

    I give every year a theme for something to do. This year it’s demolition derbies, last year was water slide parks, before that spelunking. But getting anybody to share an adventure is nigh impossible. I learned just last weekend, Memorial Day, that there’s even a word for the apathy: “staycation”. The mind boggles at the waste of opportunity.

    With all the guys going MGTOW these days, one would think a few more would want to spend that extra free time playing. I don’t mean video games, either. Any activity that makes one break a light sweat is naturally fat bitch-free. Look, male space!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Question says:

      I’ve become an avid hiker in recent years, and I’m always looking for new peaks to summit.

      That’s what men should do, rather than argue over things that go nowhere. If it doesn’t make you a better men, it’s not worth doing.

      Like

  2. Gunner Q says:

    Do you meet many new people while hiking? It isn’t something I do; my job has enough walking already. Although I’ve been thinking of trading my bicycle in for a trike and exploring bike trails for next year’s theme.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s