Why The Libertarian Movement Is Dead

Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, I present to you Exhibits A and B.

Brink Lindsey is the vice president of the Cato Institute, a D.C.-based libertarian think tank.  Here is what he had to say recently (Exhibit A) about Ron Paul, who did more than anyone other than perhaps Murray Rothbard to energize libertarianism in the U.S.

Speaking of Rothbard, Lindsey has some thoughts on him as well – Exhibit B.

Tom Woods writes:

Lindsey, meanwhile, has favored a strategy he calls “liberaltarian.” The left shares some of our views, so let’s hook up with them instead of with the right!

I think we can all see how that’s been going.

The rest is history; the right-wing libertarians were kicked out or pushed out of the libertarian movement and joined the Alt. Right.

Are there some principled libertarians still left in the libertarian movement? Certainly. But a handful of individuals does not a movement make.

The prosecution rests its case, your honor.

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6 Responses to Why The Libertarian Movement Is Dead

  1. Gunner Q says:

    Yep, the rot is at the top… of just about everything.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I just commented about those quotes by Lindsey on FEE (http://disq.us/p/1i3pih9). This just confirms my view that the CATO Institute and the Libertarian Party are just imitation Democrats. CATO has really become a disappointment. It’s hard to imagine that Rothbard had such a big role at it’s foundation.

    The ‘liberaltarian’ quote actually gives me some hope that they haven’t quite appropriated the libertarian label just yet. I haven’t given up on it yet.

    What are your thoughts about real libertarians, like you and I, commandeering the far right? The Left already puts us there, though, in there confused compass, we are lumped in with the Nazis. We can show conservatives where they are actually progressive or left wing and attempt to shame them into renouncing these positions or to precipitate their inevitable slide further Left. Or do you think libertarianism shouldn’t be left or right?

    Like

    • The Question says:

      What are your thoughts about real libertarians, like you and I, commandeering the far right?The Left already puts us there, though, in there confused compass, we are lumped in with the Nazis. We can show conservatives where they are actually progressive or left wing and attempt to shame them into renouncing these positions or to precipitate their inevitable slide further Left. Or do you think libertarianism shouldn’t be left or right?

      I have a post coming out tomorrow about why trying to avoid the Right-Left paradigm has caused libertarians to ignore much of leftist behavior, because the situation is so lopsided in terms of conduct. The idea that the Right and Left are the same or there are no fundamental differences is inane. If the Left wins, libertarians will suffer alongside those on the Alt. Right.

      Libertarians should ally with people who have similar goals and ensure our wellbeing, but our philosophy’s limited scope will always make it secondary to other considerations.

      Liked by 1 person

      • “but our philosophy’s limited scope will always make it secondary to other considerations.”

        Yup. Nonaggression is the low bar over which all cultures should pass. Too bad none of them yet do. A true movement needs a moral compass over and above the core principles of libertarianism.

        I think we need a variety of associations which give a ‘moral flavor’ to the foundations of liberty. These associations would uphold internal discipline of ideals, promote good reputable behavior, and would provide support for group members, sort of like a church without religion. As these associations become more and more influential, they may be able to handle interpersonal disputes and offenses between members. Eventually as the state withers away, these associations would provide a system of free market courts between them. A confederation of these ‘nations’ could provide for common defense against a large state aggressor.

        Even more than political secession, this is the best way forward in my consideration. Your concept of tribalism could be the beginning stage of this type of association.

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  3. Fred says:

    Flush them out with humor. It’s the best way to deal with it.

    https://www.accredited-times.com/2018/06/07/why-im-a-progressive/

    Like

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