The Robinson Crusoe Foreign Policy

The Robinson Crusoe Foreign PolicyA recent post by Quintus Curtius titled Why Every Man Should Read “Robinson Crusoe” inspired me to finally pick up the novel, after carrying it around on my bookshelf since childhood. Having read other works from the same time period, I anticipated a great deal of circumlocution in the prose that would make it unreadable.

I was pleasantly surprised to find it thoroughly engrossing. A little slow at first, the story quickly picks up once Crusoe finds himself shipwrecked and stranded alone on an island.

There were plenty of memorable passages related to religion and spirituality, but the one that struck me the most regarded his decision not to attack the cannibal tribes who arrive on the island. The reasoning he uses could very well apply to a nation and contains within it all the intellectual arguments libertarians might use to advocate a non-interventionist foreign policy.

Naturally disgusted by the cannibalistic practices of these tribes, Crusoe’s Christian beliefs urge him to stop them. Armed with rifles and pistols, he could have easily killed them all himself.

However, what restrains him is a very profound moral ethic; they have done no wrong by him, therefore he is not justified in killing them, even if they are guilty in the eyes of another. He has been granted no authority to act as the arbiter or judge in their crimes. It is only after he aids escaped savage, Friday that he becomes involved enough in their affairs to take direct action.

Crusoe soliloquies (bold emphasis added):

When I considered this a little, it followed necessarily that I was certainly in the wrong; that these people were not murderers, in the sense that I had before condemned them in my thoughts, any more than those Christians were murderers who often put to death the prisoners taken in battle; or more frequently, upon many occasions, put whole troops of men to the sword, without giving quarter, though they threw down their arms and submitted. In the next place, it occurred to me that although the usage they gave one another was thus brutish and inhuman, yet it was really nothing to me: these people had done me no injury: that if they attempted, or I saw it necessary, for my immediate preservation, to fall upon them, something might be said for it: but that I was yet out of their power, and they really had no knowledge of me, and consequently no design upon me; and therefore it could not be just for me to fall upon them; that this would justify the conduct of the Spaniards in all their barbarities practised in America, where they destroyed millions of these people; who, however they were idolators and barbarians, and had several bloody and barbarous rites in their customs, such as sacrificing human bodies to their idols, were yet, as to the Spaniards, very innocent people; and that the rooting them out of the country is spoken of with the utmost abhorrence and detestation by even the Spaniards themselves at this time, and by all other Christian nations of Europe, as a mere butchery, a bloody and unnatural piece of cruelty, unjustifiable either to God or man; and for which the very name of a Spaniard is reckoned to be frightful and terrible, to all people of humanity or of Christian compassion; as if the kingdom of Spain were particularly eminent for the produce of a race of men who were without principles of tenderness, or the common bowels of pity to the miserable, which is reckoned to be a mark of generous temper in the mind.

These considerations really put me to a pause, and to a kind of a full stop; and I began by little and little to be off my design, and to conclude I had taken wrong measures in my resolution to attack the savages; and that it was not my business to meddle with them, unless they first attacked me; and this it was my business, if possible, to prevent: but that, if I were discovered and attacked by them, I knew my duty. On the other hand, I argued with myself that this really was the way not to deliver myself, but entirely to ruin and destroy myself; for unless I was sure to kill every one that not only should be on shore at that time, but that should ever come on shore afterwards, if but one of them escaped to tell their country-people what had happened, they would come over again by thousands to revenge the death of their fellows, and I should only bring upon myself a certain destruction, which, at present, I had no manner of occasion for.

Upon the whole, I concluded that I ought, neither in principle nor in policy, one way or other, to concern myself in this affair: that my business was, by all possible means to conceal myself from them, and not to leave the least sign for them to guess by that there were any living creatures upon the island – I mean of human shape. Religion joined in with this prudential resolution; and I was convinced now, many ways, that I was perfectly out of my duty when I was laying all my bloody schemes for the destruction of innocent creatures – I mean innocent as to me. As to the crimes they were guilty of towards one another, I had nothing to do with them; they were national, and I ought to leave them to the justice of God, who is the Governor of nations, and knows how, by national punishments, to make a just retribution for national offences, and to bring public judgments upon those who offend in a public manner, by such ways as best please Him. This appeared so clear to me now, that nothing was a greater satisfaction to me than that I had not been suffered to do a thing which I now saw so much reason to believe would have been no less a sin than that of wilful murder if I had committed it; and I gave most humble thanks on my knees to God, that He had thus delivered me from blood-guiltiness; beseeching Him to grant me the protection of His providence, that I might not fall into the hands of the barbarians, or that I might not lay my hands upon them, unless I had a more clear call from Heaven to do it, in defence of my own life.

This passage should be required reading for anyone who wishes to have influence or power over a nation’s foreign policy. One can only imagine how many conflicts would have never happened if the world’s leaders heeded its wisdom.

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