The Best of (Fascist) Intentions

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It cannot be denied that Fascism and similar movements aiming at the establishment of dictatorships are full of the best intentions and that their intervention has, for the moment, saved European civilization. The merit that Fascism has thereby won for itself will live on eternally in history. But though its policy has brought salvation for the moment, it is not of the kind which could promise continued success. Fascism was an emergency makeshift. To view it as something more would be a fatal error (bold emphasis added).

So writes Ludwig Von Mises in Liberalism: In the Classical Tradition in a chapter titled “The Argument of Fascism.”

Of all his writing, this is probably the most misquoted statement by far. His detractors have no doubt used it to claim he had fascist sympathies and thus Austrian economics is crypto-fascist. But a lot of conservatives and libertarians also misunderstand the point he is making here and how it is applicable to what we will most likely witness in the United States within the next decade.

I’ve repeatedly here and elsewhere that there will be a nationalist/fascist party by 2020. We are seeing the process that will mold that party occur right before our eyes.

Mises’ points was that fascism is not the result of bad intentions, but of good ones – even if the solutions it proposes are directly responsible for its inevitable downfall. Those good intentions are only made possible by the Left’s war on private property and the natural order of things, and their unwillingness to allow more moderate solutions to the crisis they thrust upon society.

Contrary to what some may claim, fascism is an inherently right-wing ideology. Virtually all countries that had fascists in power first experienced social upheaval by communists attempting to overthrow the existing government. There is the action, then reaction.

Note I use the term “right-wing” to describe fascism and not free market or pro-liberty. It is a reactionary movement against leftist revolutionary actions carried out by communists and socialists.

If you don’t understand this relationship between the Right and Left and insist on viewing them from a freedom v. tyranny lens, then you will never fully understand how one creates the conditions under which the other can grow and thrive.

Communism created fascism, not the other way around.

Anyone who follows the liberty movement has noted the changing tones among men such as Tom Woods and Stefan Molyneux. Both have previously stressed the need for nonviolence among libertarians in response to violent leftist behavior.

However, every day it seems their rhetoric sounds more and more akin to a typical Christopher Cantwell rant. Cantwell made an excellent point on his podcast recently; when men of peace have given up on a search for a peaceful solution, then you know none will be found and violence is not far away.

We are at the tail end of a relentless 50+ war waged by leftists against the pillars of Western society, culture, religion, and politics. They have persecuted dissidents, banned them from social media, doxxed anonymous commentators, rioted outside of peaceful rallies and speeches,  and made death threats against those who challenge their beliefs.

They have done everything possible to bring ordinary life activities under the scrutiny of the state, which is now controlled by a man they could not hate more.

The more desperate they grow, the more violent they will become to even the slightest sign of opposition. Neutrality and apolitical posturing will do no good. You will either be with them or an enemy to be destroyed.

In a recent video, Molyneux contemplated whether or not there are any more arguments to be made, whether open conflict is the only option left.

Some may find his reluctance troublesome, but it’s probably because he knows that when the Saxon finally relearns to hate, it will not be a libertarian paradise they erect, but a fascist one. The reaction they spearhead will be swift, brutal, and terrible.

More importantly, the measures taken will address genuine problems left unattended for too long. To do nothing will be inconceivable. Ordinary people who otherwise would have never contemplated supporting such conduct will begrudgingly cooperate.

Reflecting on the Berkley riots, Roosh V made a salient point on Trump that indicates how this kind of government could arise. He could wait until the Left does something so horrific the country finally swerves to the Right and gives him carte blanche to do whatever he pleases (18:46).

If that occurs, I don’t know for certain what the government will look like a decade from now. Nor do I know what values the society and culture will promote.

But I can say this: even if this government addresses the many grievances we have voiced for decades, the means by which the West rectifies them will certainly come at a high cost for those who live through it. Moreover, it will sow the seeds for its own demise sometime in the future.

My hope is that this new regime, whatever it faults, allows at least one generation that has yet to be born a chance to know a life of peace, a life that was denied to we the living.

Further, my hope is that whatever they think of the government in place, they understand that many of those who allowed it to take over were full of the best intentions, and that their intervention, for the moment, saved Western civilization.

Perhaps the role we libertarians can play after this has come to pass is to continue teaching the principles of liberty as best we can, so when that generation finally rises to remove the fascist government they will not replace it with a leftist one, but with little to no state at all.

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4 Responses to The Best of (Fascist) Intentions

  1. “Perhaps the role we libertarians can play after this has come to pass is to continue teaching the principles of liberty as best we can, so when that generation finally rises to remove the fascist government they will not replace it with a leftist one, but with little to no state at all.”

    “…but with little to no state at all.” This kind of “thinking” has been around for some 240 years. Collectively speaking and considering all the children yet to be born, do we really want to subject them to another 240 years of abject criminal tyranny?

    Considering the centuries of dictatorship under the rule of kings and queens and the likes of Obama, the Bush family, Tricky Dick, the good ol’ boys, Theodore and Franklin, Woodrow Wilson and last, but certainly not least, Trump, do we really believe things are going to somehow, magically change? Ya believe that and I’ve some swamp land in Florida I’d be happy to sell you…

    When are we going to wake up? You cannot have your cake and eat it too. In other words, you can’t be free and be governed. Duh!!! It’s a contradiction, an oxymoron. It’s oil and water. They just don’t mix, and all the waiting and believing isn’t going to change it!!

    Bill Ernstberger

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    • The Question says:

      I truly do share your sentiment; I just don’t see a way around the current predicament we’re in. We’re on a sinking ship. Pointing out the design flaws right now, while accurate, don’t address the immediate problem.

      There’s what I want to see happen, what is possible, and what is most likely to occur.

      If there is a realistic, plausible alternative to what I just described, I want to hear it and see how it can be implemented – and soon. We’re running out of time.

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      • There is nothing realistic or plausible coming out of Washington, D.C. To seek a realistic, plausible solution to these problems with which we face is neither realistic or plausible.

        I see no hope. I see no evidence of a ground-swell of angry people sufficient to turn this nation around. When millions upon millions of victims of horrendous criminal carnage haven’t the capacity to see the crimes put upon them by their so-called “leaders” and “protectors,” there can’t even be the simple defensive reflex of blocking a punch.

        I spoke with a woman in Walmart recently. She was looking at women’s clothing. I asked her if she was aware that “RFID” chips were in the clothing you buy from Walmart. She then asked what is an RFID chip?

        I explained that it was a device so tiny and technologically so advanced that it is in all driver’s licenses throughout the country. It has the capacity to communicate with a satellite 22,000 miles in the air and enables the government to know the whereabouts of any and all of us.

        Her response? “Well, I guess if I do nothing wrong, I have nothing to worry about…” This is the pervasive mind set of America. There is no hope. You can’t fight what you don’t see.

        Bill Ernstberger

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      • The Question says:

        “There is nothing realistic or plausible coming out of Washington, D.C. To seek a realistic, plausible solution to these problems with which we face is neither realistic or plausible.

        I see no hope. I see no evidence of a ground-swell of angry people sufficient to turn this nation around.”

        Which is why I’ve reached the conclusion that I have: perhaps the best thing libertarians can do is continue teaching and educating as best we can and exerting strength where we can and must.

        Our job, as I see it, is to survive whatever is coming, so our message doesn’t die out.

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