Just Don’t Argue on Facebook

Dean Abbott at The Lower Lights writes about why he has stopped arguing on Facebook.

If I believed that changing people’s mind were possible, I might have come to some other conclusion. But, people who advance decadent opinions on social media don’t change their minds. In fact, their minds have very little to do with it.

The central reason for putting forward such opinions on social media is to signal others that you are one of the cool people. The point is to show that you are on the right side of history. It’s not about the content; it’s about the subtext.

All I can say is great minds think alike.

This is something that the Alt. Right understood from the beginning. You don’t argue with your enemies. Debates are for people who have common cultural values. You keep hurling your ideas at them and let them sort it or trigger themselves silly.

I see stuff all the time on my Facebook feed that tempts me to jump in, but then I remind myself that they are not asking a question when they post an offensive statement or some meme or throw out a controversial opinion. They do it to preach and evangelize their ideology, not discuss.

You might as well be arguing with the animatronic figures on the Pirates of the Caribbean Ride about how the dog is never going to move. They’ll still offer the bone.

Go do something else with your time. Read a book. Work out. Study history. Listen to a podcast. Anything.

There is a time and a place for everything, except arguments on Facebook

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Just Don’t Argue on Facebook

  1. DM says:

    “Debates are for people who have common cultural values.”
    Nominated for “Best line of the year”

    Like

  2. GREG NIKOLIC says:

    Mmmmm . . . And yet, I like the haters and the challengers. Those who get up in your face, toe to toe . . .

    Benjamin Franklin had an opponent in the political legislature who just wouldn’t stop sniping at him. One day, Ben had an idea. He asked to borrow a book from the good gentleman’s library.

    The man, surprised at this gentle request, lent it to him. Afterward, feeling he had made a friend who “owed” him something, the man stopped attacking Franklin and became one of his best allies.

    On one major website, I am being attacked by number of commentators because of who I am. In one case, I lashed back severely — just to show I had balls, and didn’t care.

    But in other case, rather than blindly opposing the challenger, I said, “I understand I said something that touched a negative nerve. I won’t apologize for my mischievousness, but I understand where you’re coming from and I bear you no ill will.”

    This was a powerful statement by me. Trump’s thin-skinnedness, as a man, is off-putting. I believe a superior should be willing to fight — and willing to compromise, when it is in his best interest.

    It remains to be seen whether you are a superior, The Question, and if this is a superior site, or if you are following in Trump’s footsteps with possible sensitivity and inability to take natural debate. I will continue following and see.

    On today’s Elite Avenue, my website (www.eliteavenue.wordpress.com) I have a satirical news article I wrote on the left-liberals of a real workplace suddenly changing their tune in regards to Trump. It’s professional-quality writing, and quite funny. I also have more fiction coming up from “Danger Boy” — the retarded boy with the au pair in the house who writes his own fiction. And some more good political stuff which you should like. ~ Greg NIkolic out for now

    Like

    • The Question says:

      Benjamin Franklin had an opponent in the political legislature who just wouldn’t stop sniping at him. One day, Ben had an idea. He asked to borrow a book from the good gentleman’s library.

      The man, surprised at this gentle request, lent it to him. Afterward, feeling he had made a friend who “owed” him something, the man stopped attacking Franklin and became one of his best allies.

      Yes, I recall that story as well. Ben was a smart man.

      There is a time and place to debate, but Facebook does not provide it. I wouldn’t mind debating someone live or in Skype or whatnot, but those are appropriate venues. Blogs also provide you with the time to respond to other people’s writing and is a form of literary debate.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s